What to plant in july in utah

what to plant in july in utah

Average Planting Time Beets July 1-August 1 Cabbage May 1-July 15 Kale July 1-August 15 Lettuce June 1-August 1 Onion August 1-August 10 Rutabaga June 15-July 1 Spinach July 1-August 15 Turnip July 1-August 1 Vegetable planting dates for the Washington County area are different than most of the rest of Utah

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Plant Fall Vegetables Now for a Late Utah Harvest

  • From millcreekgardens.com
  • Publish date: 17/09/2022
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  • Description: You can also plant broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage and kohlrabi now, as a light frost won’t damage them either. Cheat Mother Nature for Even More Fall Vegetables.
  • Sumary: Plant Fall Vegetables Now for a Late Utah Harvest – Millcreek GardenCan you believe it’s time to plant fall vegetables already?This summer has certainly flown by. With less than three…
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Gardening in Utah: The Best Time of Year to Plant Vegetables

  • From jenniferholmstead.com
  • Publish date: 17/09/2022
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  • Description: Tender vegetable options to consider are tomato, cucumbers, summer squash, corn, and beans. Very tender vegetables are tomato, eggplant, okra, …
  • Sumary: Gardening in Utah: The Best Time of Year to Plant Vegetables Growing your own vegetables has many benefits. It is healthier than store-bought and fresher.  Because of the freshness, it beats the flavor of…
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Now's good time to plant for fall harvest – Deseret News

  • From deseret.com
  • Publish date: 17/09/2022
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  • Description: Direct seed from the middle to the end of July: beans, beets, broccoli, cabbage and cauliflower, carrots, green onions, lettuce, peas and …
  • Sumary: Now’s good time to plant for fall harvest – Deseret News Most of us are only too happy to think that the gardening season is on the downhill slope. We…
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When to Plant Vegetables in Salt Lake City, UT – Garden.org

  • From garden.org
  • Publish date: 17/09/2022
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  • Description: Now, for all the summer vegetables like beans, cowpeas, corn, squashes, pumpkins, cucumbers, watermelons, gourds and sunflowers, you should plant those …
  • Sumary: When to Plant Vegetables in Salt Lake City, UT For the Spring:Cole crops like broccoli, cauliflower, and cabbage can be direct seeded into your garden around April 3, assuming the…
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How to plan your vegetable garden: A-Z – Foodscaping Utah

  • From foodscapingutah.org
  • Publish date: 17/09/2022
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  • Description: In our climate, mid May is often a good time to plant tomatoes, for example, but not the best time to plant peas or spinach. Early summer is …
  • Sumary: How to plan your vegetable garden: A-Z The best way to get started planning your vegetable garden is to make a list of all the vegetables you love to eat!…
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Planting Calendar for Ogden, UT – The Old Farmer's Almanac

  • From almanac.com
  • Publish date: 17/09/2022
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  • Description: These include tender vegetables such as tomatoes, peppers, and eggplant, as well as crops with a long growing season, like broccoli, cauliflower, and brussels …
  • Sumary: Planting Calendar for Ogden, UT For the Almanac’s fall and spring planting calendars, we’ve calculated the best time to start seeds indoors, when to transplant young plants outside, and when to direct seed into…
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FAQs

Can anything be planted in July?

July isn’t too late to plant vegetables and herbs. Many can be succession planted and harvested multiple times. Plant fast-maturing warm season vegetables such as beans, cucumbers, Swiss chard, and summer squash and cool-season crops such as peas, kale and cabbage to be harvested in the fall.

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What can be planted now in Utah?

You can follow with the semi-hardy two or three weeks later. Cold hardy options for your Utah garden include spinach, green onion, leeks, onion, cabbage, chard, broccoli, kohlrabi, turnip, Brussel sprout, spinach, parsnips, kale, radishes, arugula, collard greens, rhubarb, mustard greens, and turnips

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Can you plant tomatoes in July in Utah?

Tomatoes love heat and sunshine, and despite our short growing season, Utah has the perfect climate for growing large, healthy plants that can start producing tomatoes before 4th of July picnics

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Is it too late to plant anything in July?

Despite common perception, July is definitely not too late to plant garden vegetables and herbs. 1? Many edibles, including both vegetables and herbs that yield multiple harvests, can be planted in midsummer for a fruitful bounty come fall

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Can I plant tomatoes in July?

That means for much of inland Southern California, tomatoes slow or stop setting fruit during the hottest months of July and August. Mid- to late June and July is the perfect time to plant another lineup of tomato plants.

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What can I plant in mid summer Utah?

Summer Crops

There are several crops that can be planted mid-summer for a fall harvest, including peas, radishes, lettuce, spinach, carrots, beets, Swiss chard, turnips, kale, kohlrabi, broccoli, cabbage, and cauliflower.

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What can I plant in July in northern Utah?

Average Planting Time Beets July 1-August 1 Cabbage May 1-July 15 Kale July 1-August 15 Lettuce June 1-August 1 Onion August 1-August 10 Rutabaga June 15-July 1 Spinach July 1-August 15 Turnip July 1-August 1 Vegetable planting dates for the Washington County area are different than most of the rest of Utah.

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How late can you plant tomatoes in Utah?

Some cities of Utah experience the danger of frost all around the year while the majority of Utah’s regions observe the last frost anytime before the 10th of May. Thus, you may plant tomatoes in the garden any day after 20th May and before 10th June.

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What vegetables can I sow in July?

By July the summer sunshine will be warming the soil and helping all our seeds to germinate well outdoors. This is the time to sow spring cabbage, broad and dwarf French beans, carrot, radish, spinach and, of course, lettuces and salad leaves.

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Plant Fall Vegetables Now for a Late Utah Harvest

Plant Fall Vegetables Now for a Late Utah Harvest – Millcreek GardenCan you believe it’s time to plant fall vegetables already?This summer has certainly flown by. With less than three months to go before our average first frost (October 26 in Salt Lake City), it’s time to take a final pass at planting for a bountiful fall vegetable harvest.Let’s take a look at what you can plant now, to enjoy as the first nip of autumn comes to call.Enjoy the Colors of Fresh Fall VegetablesYou still have time to grow some of the most vividly colored and healthy vegetable options.Beets have a short growing cycle and, in our area, are safe well into October. Carrots are another great choice that you can still plant now. In fact, most root vegetables will hold up well into the fall, some until the first hard freeze.Beets, carrots, peas and some of the green vegetables we will talk about next can all be planted twice each summer, for two full growth cycles. These plants are hardy enough to start early in the spring and replant in late summer for a second round.Grow the Fall’s Best GreensIn addition to beets, carrots and peas, this is a great time to plant some of the healthiest leafy greens.Kale and spinach are both fast growing and a little nip of cold doesn’t scare them. You can also plant a variety of different lettuces. Romaine, red leaf lettuce, butter lettuce and chard are all fast-maturing. And your leafy greens will taste better in the fall than those grown for summer harvest, as the high temperatures tend to turn them bitter.You can also plant broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage and kohlrabi now, as a light frost won’t damage them either.Cheat Mother Nature for Even More Fall VegetablesIn Northern Utah and along the Wasatch Front, anything you plant now must have a fairly short growing cycle. But you can fudge a little to extend your late summer and early fall growing season.Rather than start your fall vegetables from seed, purchase seedlings from the nursery. This will give you a two- to four-week head-start.Now consider where you want to plant your seedlings. Place them in a location that will maximize the angle of the autumn sun, but be sure they will be protected as much as possible from any early cold snaps. In fact, you may want to be prepared with cloches or coldframes, just in case.Or, if you have the capacity, plant your fall vegetables in pots or other containers. Use planters with wheels or place yours on a furniture dolly. This way, you can follow the sun and move the plants to safety if the weather turns cold.At Millcreek Gardens, we know you want to squeeze out every last drop of summer. We have trees, shrubs, plants and gardening supplies that, with the right advice and approach, can keep you growing through the fall and well into winter. Stop by and see us today and let’s get you growing those yummy fall vegetables.

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Gardening in Utah: The Best Time of Year to Plant Vegetables

Gardening in Utah: The Best Time of Year to Plant Vegetables Growing your own vegetables has many benefits. It is healthier than store-bought and fresher.  Because of the freshness, it beats the flavor of store-bought hands down. Plus you’ll know exactly what is (or isn’t) put on your food while it’s growing. The best time of year to plant vegetables in Utah varies depending on where your garden is located. The hardiness zones are divided according to the average coolest temperatures in winter. Knowing which plant hardiness zone you’re in will help you succeed more often when gardening in Utah.  Here’s what you need to know.  When to Plant Cool Season Vegetables Cool-season vegetables that can handle some degrees of frost are called cold hardy and semi-hardy. There are two growing seasons for these yummy veggies. If you live in Salt Lake City, your hardiness zone is 5. For other areas, you will need to check your hardiness zone for the exact planting dates for your garden. The first time to put cold-hardy vegetables in the ground will likely be between mid-March and May 1. The second planting season will be from July to mid-August. You can follow with the semi-hardy two or three weeks later. Cold hardy options for your Utah garden include spinach, green onion, leeks, onion, cabbage, chard, broccoli, kohlrabi, turnip, Brussel sprout, spinach, parsnips, kale, radishes, arugula, collard greens, rhubarb, mustard greens, and turnips. Semi-hardy (also called half-hardy) options are rutabaga, beets, celery, swiss chard, lettuce, carrot, radicchio, peas, potato, and cauliflower. When to Plant Warm Season Vegetables Vegetables that do well in warmer weather fall into one of two groups: tender or very tender.  You can start putting tender vegetables in the ground between May 1 and late May to early June, depending on your zone. You can follow with very tender two or three weeks later. Tender vegetable options to consider are tomato, cucumbers, summer squash, corn, and beans.   Very tender vegetables are tomato, eggplant, okra, cucumber, muskmelon, pumpkin, watermelon, cantaloupe, bush beans, winter squash, lima beans, sweet potato, and peppers. Add Time for Sowing from Seed Once you have decided which types of vegetables you want to plant, you need to research whether they are sown directly in the ground or need to be started from seed. If your choices require starting from seed, you’ll need to add in the time prior to the date they need to go into the ground. Factor in the time for obtaining the seeds, germination, and growth into seedlings. Many local nurseries sell seedlings. Buying seedlings is a good option when you’re behind schedule for getting particular veggies in the ground. Shop local nurseries Consider a locally owned nursery when shopping for plants. They are likely to have starts and seedlings that have proven winners in SLC’s dry mountain climate. Don’t be afraid to ask the local staff for advice, they will likely love sharing their tips to help make your vegetable garden a success.  Here are a few of our local faves: Millcreek GardensCactus and TropicalsWestern Gardens Have Fun Gardening in Utah The most important part of gardening in Utah is remembering to have fun learning about your garden’s individual traits. Soil conditions, weather, watering, and local wildlife/pests may all play a part in your gardening journey. It may take a season or two to really nail down the best way to grow tomatoes (or your favorite veggies) in your garden. While learning, take time to enjoy being outside and watching your plants thrive. Before you know it, you’ll be hauling in the bounty at harvest time. Contact me if you want to buy a house with the perfect yard to grow the garden of your dreams! I’m here to…

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How to plant for a fall harvest

Now's good time to plant for fall harvest – Deseret News

Now’s good time to plant for fall harvest – Deseret News Most of us are only too happy to think that the gardening season is on the downhill slope. We can sit inside with a cool lemonade and wait for the weather to cool down.Not so, according to Duane Hatch, who is busily planting for fall harvest.Longtime readers of this column know his name because each week from 1984-89 he shared his best gardening ideas in this newspaper. As a horticulturist for Utah State University Extension, he shared ideas on vegetables, fruits, lawns and ornamentals through classes, TV and many other mediums.After retirement, he and his wife, Rose Marie, served a mission in Spain for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, moved back to Oregon and returned to Salt Lake City to serve an LDS Church humanitarian mission. This included a stint in Mongolia to teach how to grow vegetables under very hostile conditions. In between, he did a weekly gardening radio program, spoke to numerous master gardeners and other groups.Above all, he plants Hatch Patch gardens wherever he goes. His trademark garden is now in Clinton, where he resides.When I visited his garden he was already in full production, but he never liked wasted space. One of his favorite axioms is, “Mother Nature never tolerates bare ground. If you don’t plant something, she will! And what she plants are weeds.”Double cropping means double harvest. His garden peas are gone but the late corn crop has replaced them. To get them off to a good start, he grew them from transplants. That corn should be ready in mid-September. The first crop he planted will be ready July 24.Hatch explains that you have to count backwards to determine what and when to plant. “If your first frost is the first of October, then you can still plant warm season crops that mature in 60 days or less because it cools down later in the season and the vegetables don’t mature as fast.”These crops include snap beans, cucumbers and summer squash. Plant them now and enjoy a harvest until frost. Summer squash produce several good pickings, but quality and production go down with age. Planting snap beans now avoids problems with the Mexican bean beetle.Hatch promotes summer planting of many other vegetables. “Cool-season crops that mature when temperatures drop in the fall are much tastier and have a better texture than those that mature in the heat of midsummer. You want them to mature in mid-September, so plant them later.”These crops include leafy vegetables such as lettuce, chard and spinach, the root crops including carrots and beets and cole crops such as broccoli, kohlrabi, cauliflower and cabbage. They are cold tolerant, so they are not damaged by light frosts in early fall.He showed me the seed he had just planted. “These are planted for my fourth crop of kohlrabi this year. This Swiss chard will produce all summer. The parsnips and carrots you see that I just planted and are growing now I intend to leave in the ground and mulch them and harvest them through the winter. I did that last year with excellent results.”While it might seem easy to throw some seeds in the ground right now, you must pay attention to some potential problems.”Keeping the soil moist is a trick,” Hatch explains. “You can sprinkle them down daily or in 100-plus weather even twice per day. I usually like to cover them with a strip of burlap or with the Remay fabric. That holds the moisture and lets you water without washing away the seeds.”Sometimes I like to plant two to three seeds in a small hole filled with potting mix so it does not crust over like the soil is inclined to do. At other times I have germinated them indoors under better conditions. You can start some indoors in a discarded cups or cell pack left over from the spring. The small transplants will be ready to set out in a couple of…

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When to Plant Vegetables in Salt Lake City, UT – Garden.org

When to Plant Vegetables in Salt Lake City, UT For the Spring:Cole crops like broccoli, cauliflower, and cabbage can be direct seeded into your garden around April 3, assuming the ground can be worked, but it’s better to start them indoors around March 6 and then transplant them into the garden around April 25. Do the same with lettuce and spinach.Plant onion starts and potatoes around March 16. Sow the seeds of peas (sugar snap and english) at the same time. If the ground is still frozen, then plant these as soon as the ground thaws.Do you want to grow tomatoes, peppers, and eggplants? Start these indoors around March 6. Then, around May 11 you should start watching the weather forecast and, as soon as no frost is forecast, go ahead and transplant those into the ground.Now, for all the summer vegetables like beans, cowpeas, corn, squashes, pumpkins, cucumbers, watermelons, gourds and sunflowers, you should plant those seeds directly into the ground around May 15, or if your soil is still very cold, once the soil is near 60° F in temperature. Having said that, we note that your location has a shorter than average growing season. Many summer vegetables need more days to mature than your area will provide. For that reason, we recommend you get a head-start by starting these summer vegetables indoors around April 25, and transplant those seedlings out after the danger of frost is past.Okay, now here are the cold, hard numbers, along with specific plants: Crop Sow seeds indoors Transplant seedlings into the garden Direct sow seeds Asparagus n/a Mar 31 – Apr 15 n/a Beans n/a n/a May 15 – Jun 12 Beets n/a n/a Mar 20 – Apr 3 Broccoli Mar 6 – Mar 20 Apr 17 – May 1 n/a Brussel Sprouts Mar 6 – Mar 20 Apr 17 – May 1 n/a Cabbage Mar 6 – Mar 20 Apr 17 – May 1 n/a Cantaloupe n/a n/a May 1 – May 15 Carrots n/a n/a Apr 3 – May 1 Cauliflower Mar 6 – Mar 20 Apr 17 – May 1 n/a Chard n/a n/a Apr 3 – Apr 17 Collards Mar 6 – Mar 20 Apr 17 – May 1 n/a Corn n/a n/a May 15 – May 29 Cucumbers n/a n/a May 15 – May 29 Eggplants Mar 6 – Mar 20 May 15 – May 29 n/a Gourds, Squash and Pumpkins n/a n/a May 15 – May 29 Kale Mar 6 – Mar 20 Apr 17 – May 1 n/a Kohlrabi Mar 6 – Mar 20 Apr 17 – May 1 n/a Lettuce Mar 6 – Mar 20 Apr 3 – May 1 Apr 3 – May 1 Mustard Mar 6 – Mar 20 Apr 17 – May 1 n/a Okra n/a n/a May 15 – May 29 Onions Feb 28 – Mar 6 Mar 16 – Apr 15 n/a Peas (English) n/a n/a Mar 16 – Apr 15 Peas (Southern) n/a n/a May 15 – Jun 12 Peas (Sugar Snap) n/a n/a Mar 16 – Apr 15 Peppers Mar 6 – Mar 20 May 15 – May 29 n/a Potatoes n/a n/a Mar 16 – Apr 15 Radishes n/a n/a Mar 31 – May 29 Spinach Mar 6 – Mar 20 Apr 17 – May 1 Mar 31 – May 1 Sweet Potatoes n/a May 15 – Jun 5 n/a Tomatoes Mar 6 – Mar 20 May 15 – May 29 n/a Watermelon n/a n/a May 15 – May 29 For the Fall:Gardening in the fall can be much more challenging than spring planting, because you are in a race to get your crops mature and harvested before the winter frosts begin, around October 25. This means you need to consider how much time each variety needs between planting and picking. Those numbers vary widely between different varieties of the same kinds of plants! Usually the “Days to Harvest” are present on the seed packet. Most tomatoes, peppers and eggplants, for example, require around 100 days to harvest, therefore you’d want to transplant those into the ground around July 17….

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How to plan your vegetable garden: A-Z – Foodscaping Utah

How to plan your vegetable garden: A-Z The best way to get started planning your vegetable garden is to make a list of all the vegetables you love to eat! Get excited to grow some of your own food and make a good plan with planting dates and spacing that is best for the particular plants you want to grow. An hour of planning is worth more than a day of hard work. Start growing what you like, and by growing your own, you’ll find your favorite fruits and vegetables taste even better and have more intense flavors. Then, you can start to experiment with other vegetables even if you aren’t sure how much you like them. We try to grow a few new things each year and are usually glad we did. Beets, for example, we were never too fond of until we grew our own and now they have become a staple. The same goes for eggplant. They are delicious and ornamental as well; two of our favorite things in foodscaping. Don’t forget to plan on incorporating some flowers in your foodscape, to add beauty, biodiversity, and to attract beneficial insects. General Recommendations We’ll start here with some basic, general recommendations, but read on for more planning and growing tips that can really ramp up production in small spaces. Before you get too far planning what vegetables to grow and when to plant them, make sure you have created an environment where they can thrive. A major focus should be establishing healthy soil with plenty of organic matter and considering how much direct sunlight your garden areas get. After you have a list of the vegetables you’d like to grow, do a little research on each one to consider what time of year they grow best and how much space they require. USU Extension has a great website to start researching how to grow just about any fruit or vegetable. If you are using seeds, the information on the seed packet is also very useful. Pay special attention to the suggested planting times as well as the days-to-maturity information. A simplified way to look at timing is to group vegetables into two categories: cool season versus warm season. Cool season crops include peas, spinach, lettuces, beets, broccoli, cabbage, etc. and warm season crops include tomatoes, peppers, corn, cucumber, eggplant, squash, pumpkin, etc. A common mistake that many people make is planting all the vegetables they want to grow at the same time (in May, let’s say) without considering the best timing for the crop. In our climate, mid May is often a good time to plant tomatoes, for example, but not the best time to plant peas or spinach. Early summer is spinach’s flowering time so when planted in May, spinach tends to bolt quickly without giving you many leaves. Peas do not do well in the hot, dry weather of summer. They are much happier in the cool wetter weather of spring. We plant peas and spinach in March and by late spring we are finished harvesting them. Spinach also grows well in the cooler weather of the fall well after its flowering time has already past. June 3May 9 For those in Utah along the Wasatch Front and with similar climates, here’s a general example of planting dates for some of our favorite vegetables (USU has a great reference guide here): Early spring (March-early April): Peas, spinach, broccoli, cabbage, radish, turnip. Mid spring (mid March-April): Beets, lettuce, carrots, dill, parsley, potato, Swiss…

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Planting Calendar for Ogden, UT – The Old Farmer's Almanac

Planting Calendar for Ogden, UT For the Almanac’s fall and spring planting calendars, we’ve calculated the best time to start seeds indoors, when to transplant young plants outside, and when to direct seed into the ground. Planting Dates for FallOn average, your first fall frost occurs on October 17 (at OGDEN PIONEER PH, UT climate station).Crop Based on Frost DatesStart Seeds Indoors by…Plant Seedlings Outdoors by…Start Seeds Outdoors by…ArugulaN/AN/A Sep 12BeetsN/AN/A Sep 2Bell Peppers May 4 Jun 29N/ABroccoli Jul 6 Aug 3N/ACabbage Jun 26 Jul 24N/ACantaloupesN/AN/A Jun 19CarrotsN/AN/A Aug 28Cauliflower Jul 6 Aug 3N/ACelery Apr 25 Jul 4N/ACornN/AN/A Jul 9CucumbersN/AN/A Jul 14Eggplants May 4 Jun 29N/AGreen BeansN/AN/A Jul 14Jalapeño Peppers May 24 Jul 19N/AKale Jul 26 Aug 23N/AKohlrabiN/AN/A Aug 28LettuceN/AN/A Sep 7OkraN/AN/A Jul 9ParsnipsN/AN/A Jul 14PeasN/AN/A Aug 13PotatoesN/AN/A Aug 3PumpkinsN/AN/A May 30RadishesN/AN/A Sep 12SpinachN/AN/A Sep 22Sweet Potatoes May 15 Jun 19N/ASwiss ChardN/AN/A Sep 7Tomatoes May 9 Jul 4N/ATurnipsN/AN/A Sep 7WatermelonsN/AN/A Jun 19Winter SquashN/AN/A Jul 4ZucchiniN/AN/A Jul 19Planting Dates for SpringOn average, your last spring frost occurs on April 28 (at OGDEN PIONEER PH, UT climate station, elevation 4350 feet).Crop Based on Frost Dates Based on Moon DatesStart Seeds IndoorsPlant Seedlingsor TransplantsStart Seeds OutdoorsArugulaN/AN/A Apr 14-28 Apr 14-16Basil Mar 2-17 Mar 2-17 Apr 28-May 19 Apr 30-May 15N/ABeetsN/AN/A Apr 14-May 5 Apr 17-29Bell Peppers Feb 16-Mar 2 Feb 16 May 5-19 May 5-15N/ABroccoli Mar 2-17 Mar 2-17 Mar 31-Apr 21 Apr 1-16N/ACabbage Mar 2-17 Mar 2-17 Mar 31-Apr 14 Apr 1-14N/ACantaloupes Mar 31-Apr 7 Apr 1- 7 May 12-26 May 12-15N/ACarrotsN/AN/A Mar 24-Apr 7 Mar 24-31Cauliflower Mar 2-17 Mar 2-17 Mar 31-Apr 21 Apr 1-16N/ACelery Feb 16-Mar 2 Feb 16 May 5-19 May 5-15N/AChivesN/AN/A Mar 31-Apr 7 Apr 1- 7Cilantro (Coriander)N/AN/A Apr 28-May 12 Apr 30-May 12CornN/AN/A May 12-Jun 2 May 12-15, May 30-Jun 2Cucumbers Mar 31-Apr 7 Apr 1- 7 May 12-26 May 12-15N/ADillN/AN/A Apr 28-Jun 2 Apr 30-May 15Eggplants Mar 2-17 Mar 2-17 May 12-26 May 12-15N/AGreen BeansN/AN/A May 5-26 May 5-15Jalapeño Peppers Feb 16-Mar 2 Feb 16 May 5-19 May 5-15N/AKale Mar 2-17 Mar 2-17 Mar 31-Apr 21 Apr 1-16N/AKohlrabi Mar 17-31 Mar 17-18 Apr 7-14 Apr 7-14N/ALettuce Mar 17-31 Mar 17-18 Apr 14-May 12 Apr 14-16, Apr 30-May 12N/AOkraN/AN/A May 12-26 May 12-15OnionsN/AN/A Mar 31-Apr 21 Mar 31, Apr 17-21Oregano Feb 16-Mar 17 Feb 16, Mar 3-17 Apr 28-May 19 Apr 30-May 15N/AParsleyN/AN/A Mar 31-Apr 14 Apr 1-14ParsnipsN/AN/A Apr 7-28 Apr 17-28PeasN/AN/A Mar 17-Apr 7 Mar 17-18, Apr 1- 7PotatoesN/AN/A Apr 21-May 12 Apr 21-29Pumpkins Apr 7-21 Apr 7-16 May 12-26 May 12-15N/ARadishesN/AN/A Mar 2-24 Mar 19-24Rosemary Feb 16-Mar 2 Feb 16 May 5-26 May 5-15N/ASage Mar 2-17 Mar 2-17 Apr 28-May 12 Apr 30-May 12N/ASpinachN/AN/A Mar 17-Apr 7 Mar 17-18, Apr 1- 7Sweet PotatoesN/AN/A May 19-Jun 2 May 19-29Swiss Chard Mar 17-31 Mar 17-18 Apr 7-14 Apr 7-14N/AThyme Feb 16-Mar 17 Feb 16, Mar 3-17 Apr 28-May 19 Apr 30-May 15N/ATomatoes Mar 2-17 Mar 2-17 May 5-26 May 5-15N/ATurnipsN/AN/A Mar 31-Apr 21 Mar 31, Apr 17-21Watermelons Mar 31-Apr 7 Apr 1- 7 May 12-26 May 12-15N/AWinter SquashN/AN/A May 12-Jun 9 May 12-15, May 30-Jun 9ZucchiniN/AN/A May 12-Jun 9 May 12-15, May 30-Jun 9 How to Use the Planting Calendar This planting calendar is a guide that tells…

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How to plant for a fall harvest